Welcome to Domme, welcome to the heart of the Black Périgord: around 1281, King Philip III, known as 'the bold,' decided to create the bastide of Domme on 'la barre,' the cliff that overlooks the Dordogne River by more than 150m. The charm of Domme is undeniable, there reigns a particularly calm and serene atmosphere, which soothes the soul as fully as the exceptional panorama of the Dordogne valley, which reveals the castle of Montfort, the village of La Roque Gageac, and the castle of Beynac. But fate has offered many other treasures to Domme         Welcome to Domme, welcome to the heart of the Black Périgord: around 1281, King Philip III, known as 'the bold,' decided to create the bastide of Domme on 'la barre,' the cliff that overlooks the Dordogne River by more than 150m. The charm of Domme is undeniable, there reigns a particularly calm and serene atmosphere, which soothes the soul as fully as the exceptional panorama of the Dordogne valley, which reveals the castle of Montfort, the village of La Roque Gageac, and the castle of Beynac. But fate has offered many other treasures to Domme

History


Around 1281, King Philip III, known as "le hardi" (the bold), decided to build a fortified town on "la barre", a cliff overhanging the Dordogne by more than 150 metres. The bastide was built according to the "rules", i.e. a regular plan, streets intersecting at right angles, square squares, a market place, etc. After numerous restorations, the bastide has survived and continues to bear witness to the richness of its past.

Although prehistoric times have left many traces, Domme experienced its most exciting times during the Middle Ages. The various episodes of the Hundred Years' War can still be read between the worn yellow stones, and Domme would never have been built on such a high cliff if enemy threats had not been so numerous.

The most imposing remains of this military aspect make the bastide town of Domme a remarkable site. The ramparts and the various gates that gave access to it are still largely present in an extraordinary state of preservation. The most impressive is undoubtedly the Porte des Tours, which demonstrates the extent to which the king wanted to confuse potential attackers by imposing aesthetic constraints on the builders of the fortifications.

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